Your Windshield is a lot Bigger than Your Rearview Mirror

Written By: Brooke Falk, Director

This article originally appeared in the October issue of Limousin Today

https://view.joomag.com/limousin-today-october-limtoday-web/0354488001538149344?short

It was a journey for me to become a member of the NALJA Board of Directors. I first ran in 2015. Fresh out of high school I was ready to face new challenges and opportunities. Sadly, that year serving as a board member just was not meant to be for me. I would be lying if I said I was not disappointed. A week later my family’s world was turned upside down. My mom was diagnosed with nasopharyngeal cancer. Although this cancer is treatable it is a very rigorous and difficult treatment. I spent my first year of college taking her to appointments and doing my homework in the waiting area. Even after she was pronounced cancer free, she continued to have issues due to the radiations side effects. She was just starting to get back to “normal” around Jr. nationals in 2016. With everything that my family had been through I felt it was time to do something “normal” again and I decided not to run for the board that year. However, in 2017, my dream came true when I finally made the Jr. board.

Upon arriving home from Grand Island I received a call. Little did I know that that call would change the way I lived my life. The call was from a familiar face among Kansas Limousin breeders, Chris Campbell. He did not have much to say, but he gave me this advice “remember that your windshield is a lot bigger than your rear-view mirror.”

When I began to consider this saying, I instantly associated it with what had happened in the last two years to me and my family. I knew I needed to look ahead, through my “windshield” and focus on being a great board member. I needed to look back and see where I have grown from the trials in my life, that were now in my “rear-view mirror”, but not get caught up in the negative and feel sorry for myself because spending too much time staring at your “rear-view mirror” will cause you to crash. Life moves forward, not backward, and getting caught up in the past will cause you to miss out on what is happening right in front of you. I could easily fall into this bad habit, and there are days I do. There are days I have trouble seeing past the frustrations and trials in my life, like dealing with my mother’s continued health issues or the frustration of ending my junior show career having never done as well as I had hoped at Jr. Nationals. However, living by this quote, I have learned to move forward and not dwell in the past. Learning from the past is a huge part of life, but dwelling in it will ruin it.

Limousin Juniors take Chris Campbell’s advice, “remember your windshield is a lot bigger than your rear-view mirror.” Look forward, you all have a bright future ahead of you whether that is taking home a banner at you next show, getting onto the team you tried out for, or even farther down the line when you get your dream job. Do not let hardships and mistakes you see in your “rear-view mirror” hold you back, learn and grow from what you see so you can achieve what is ahead through your “windshield.”

Thank you Chris, your advice and humor over the years has been greatly appreciated!

The “Show Family”

Written By: Callie Hicks, Director

This article originally appeared in the August issue of Limousin Today

https://view.joomag.com/limousin-today-limtoday-august18-web/0828593001533132549?short

Growing up in the show world there are individuals that are your second moms and dads, an extra set of hands in the stalls, or a given babysitter for younger kids. This is what many call our show family. It’s the set of people you cannot imagine being without at a show. Whether it be your local county show friends or those all the way across the nation, these connections tend to be the most important.IMG_7353.JPG

In the future your show family may help find your next animal, or your next job. The most important thing our show families give us is constant support and encouragement. However, for those that are like me getting older is sad. Certain members of your show family start to age out or merge into other breeds. But events like the National Junior Limousin Show and Congress allow for the show family to expand constantly.

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Thankfully, I have been fortunate enough to keep adding to my show family throughout the years. With each new year at Junior Nationals we meet new people that become part of our family and each year the parting of ways at the conclusion of junior nationals doesn’t get any easier. However, the goodbye is not for long and is simply an “I’ll see you again”.

IMG_7499These shows and show families can be the gateway to a future within the industry. My show family has given me a passion for photography and the constant encouragement to pursue this passion. I encourage you to make connections throughout your time within the cattle industry and keep those connections as you progress in life. For those of you who are aging out, show those younger members of your show family the support and encouragement they need. Always remember, there is someone somewhere who looks up to you, make sure you are setting the right example.

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ILC Visits Fillmore Ranch and Olympic Training Center

Written by: Megan Marion

IMG_0878The attendees had another early morning as they boarded the bus and headed south to Fillmore Ranch. Immediately when everyone arrived they jumped on the buses and gave a quick tour and talked about their ranch. Fillmore Ranch has been in Boone, Colorado for 101 years. They used to raise Charolais until 2002, when they bought their first registered Limousin heifers. They decided the Limousin breed was the best fit for what they were trying to do. On their ranch they have around 400 head of cattle. They sell about 80 bulls each year, and around 80% of the bulls they sell go to buyers within a 200 to 300-mile radius. They also discussed the struggles of living in a dry area and what steps they take to keep their operation running successfully.  After they talked about their ranch, we had a delicious lunch and hopped back on the bus and headed to the Olympic Training Center.

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The Olympic Training Center was astonishing. After enjoying a 15-minute video about the training center, we set off on our tour. We visited the Ted Stevens Sport Services Center, Aquatics Center, the wrestling gym, as well as the shooting center. It was a very interesting tour to see not only the facilities, but athletes in training as well. We headed back to the hotel, and the attendees had a free night to enjoy the night as they wished!

ILC Technical Session Day

Written by: Megan Marion

IMG_7661Today started off in the beautiful Antlers Hotel in Colorado Springs with a technical session. At 9:00 a.m. Hannah Garrett, a territorial manager for GeneSeek Operations welcomed everyone and started off the technical session. We also heard from Butch Whitman, a consulting nutritionist for MoorMan’s, ADM Alliance Nutrition, and Westfeeds, and Dr. Tonya Amen, a geneticist for NALF. Brett Spader, the CEO for National Center of Beef Excellence was the moderator for the panel discussion. The three panelists were, Kenny Stauffer, director of beef sales for GeneSeek Operations, Brian Bertelsen, V.P. of field operations for U.S. Premium Beef, and Mark Anderson, the executive director for the North American Limousin Foundation. The panel discussed the success of Certified Angus Beef and branded beef products in the U.S. and potential opportunities for Limousin cattle.  After the panel discussion, everyone enjoyed a delicious lunch provided by the hotel, and that afternoon the attendees headed to Spruce Mountain Ranch for dinner.

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Spruce Mountain Ranch was an excellent setting for a beautiful dinner. Everyone img_0865.jpgenjoyed walking around the ranch and admiring the gorgeous scenery. Once the delicious dinner was served and everyone had eaten, we welcomed out first guest speaker, Rick Pfortmiller to start speaking. Rick is a beef genomics territory manager for Neogen Geneseek. We also listened to Twig Marston, a member of the beef technical services team covering Kansas and Nebraska. It was a beautiful evening, and we even sang happy birthday to Mark Anderson to finish off the night! We would like to thank all of the speakers that attended today!

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ILC Takes On Cheyenne Frontier Days

Written by: Megan Marion

IMG_0842What a wonderful day at Cheyenne! The weather was perfect and so was the rodeo. Before the rodeo started, attendees were able to walk around in the old frontier town, look around in shops, as well as explore the Indian Village. Everyone was very excited once the rodeo kicked off, especially those who were first experiencing a rodeo. They were celebrating Military Monday in Cheyenne and they kicked off the rodeo with an amazing tribute to our military. They started off with steer wresting, bareback riding, bull riding, saddle bronc riding, team roping, barrel racing and the very eventful wild horse race to finish off the event!

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Once we left Cheyenne, we headed to the Anheuser-Busch Factory in Fort Collins and enjoyed a tour, a delicious dinner, and of course beer! The factory in Fort Collins opened in 1988 and produces many types of the Anheuser-Busch products. After a very eventful day, the attendees headed to Colorado Springs to get a good night’s sleep before the technical session in the morning!

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Full day for ILC Attendees

Written by: Megan Marion

IMG_0784The International Limousin Conference Attendees woke up bright and early to eat breakfast and jump on the buses to head to Ochsner Limousin. The Ochsner family welcomed everyone and discussed a little about their cattle history and how they got started in the Limousin breed. On their ranch, they have around 125 cows, and approximately 60 percent of their herd is Lim-Flex. After their welcome, the attendees had the opportunity to see three different sectors of IMG_0788their operation. They showed us their show cattle sector, cow-calf and bull sector, as well as their Tenderlean Beef portion of their operation. We then jumped back on the bus and arrived at Five Rivers.

The Five Rivers staff shuffled everyone inside for a short presentation about their operation before heading out to look at the cattle. Five Rivers is the largest cattle feeder in the world. The feedlot we visited in Kersey, Colorado has a capacity of 98,000 head. We’d like to thank the Five Rivers staff for an amazing and educational tour of their operation.img_0791.jpg

img_0806.jpgFollowing the tour of Five Rivers, we headed to 70 Ranch for a delicious lunch provided by CSU. They then gave a presentation their Subsurface Irrigation Efficiency Project, discussing new technology, water efficiency, and conservation. After a quick tour, the attendees headed to Greeley Hat Works.

The attendees were impressed with Greeley Hat Works as soon as they walked into the building. The employees discussed their history as well as their process on how they custom make each hat to fit a certain individual. After a quick tour, the attendees had the privilege to listen to a live band, Terra Bella from Nashville, while they enjoyed some drinks and chatted with each other. Greeley Hat Works also made a generous offer that every hat they sold during our tour they would donate 20% to the North American Limousin Junior Association! Then they jumped on the bus to head to the final stop of the day, Platte River Fort.

The Platte River Fort was a beautiful destination to end the day. While waiting for dinner to be served, everyone enjoyed their drinks, listened to music, as well as played some fun yard games. Dinner wasn’t served like any normal dinner. Colorado State University served us six different types of steak to taste and would ask us questions to see which ones were the most flavorful, tender, and was the favorite. Everyone enjoyed discussing their likes and dislikes for their steaks, as well as the wonderful dinner they provided.

After a long day, everyone headed back to the hotel for a good nights sleep before heading to Cheyenne tomorrow for the Cheyenne Frontier Days!

 

ILC Visits Magness Land and Cattle

fullsizeoutput_202aAfter visiting Estes Park this morning, the ILC attendees had the opportunity to tour Magness Land and Cattle in Platteville, Colorado. Right off of the tour bus, the attendees were welcomed with snacks and drinks for a short social period where they had the opportunity to enjoy their drinks and talk with Magness employees.IMG_0757

Magness runs about 120 Lim-Flex and commercial cows on the one location we toured. They market approximately 300 commercial bulls as well as their purebred sales each year. Following the tour of their operation, everyone gathered at the show barn for extra questions and discussion. We would like to thank the Magness crew for giving an excellent tour of their operation.